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Day of the Dead / Dia de los Muertos



by Ladislao Loera
Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) is celebrated throughout Mexico and the Southwest States and coincides with the Christian All Souls and All Saints Days. On November 1 and 2 people remember those who are deceased. November 1 is considered the Dia de los Angelitos—the day to remember children that have died, November 2 is the traditional Dia de los Muertos.


Pictures of the deceased are placed on Dia de los Muertos altars with their favorite food and drink. Candles to light their way home and soap and water to freshen-up after their long trip back are also often placed on altars. Trinkets they were fond of, symbols they would understand and gifts are left to communicate to them that they are always in the hearts of those they left behind and that they are still part of the family even though they aren't physically with us any longer.

Baja Mexico Winter Time Change

For Baja California on Nov 4, 2018 - Daylight Saving Time Starts at 2:00:00 AM; turned your clocks backward an 1 hour...or before you go to bed turned your clocks backward 1 hour. There will be more light in the morning of Nov 4, 2018 than the day before. Also called Fall Back and Winter Time.

For Baja California Sur on Oct. 28, 2018 - Daylight Saving Time Starts at 2:00:00 AM; turned your clocks backward 1 hour...or before you go to bed turned your clocks backward 1 hour. There will be more light in the morning of Oct. 28, 2018 than the day before. Also called Fall Back and Winter Time.

Wind Scorpion of Baja


With a reputation nobody can envy, the wind scorpion is an insect spread across most arid places in the world, including Baja California. It is known under several other names: sunscorpion, windspider, sun spider, camel spider, and even deer killer or camel killer.

The rumors related to the viciousness of the windscorpion go back to the 2003 Iraq war. These rumors painted the picture of a huge insect that ran faster than humans. It was extremely poisonous, with venom that could knock out a camel. It became infamous for its voracious appetite, able to eat chunks of big animals or even people.

Mexican Home & Condo Insurance for Baja Good Life Club Members



Mexican Home and Condo Insurance

Special Savings for Baja Good Life Club Members, get your discount on already competitive prices regardless of where in Mexico or Baja your home is located. Questions about home/condo insurance, please contact Jason Wagner (818) 788-5353. Be sure to have your club member ID ready.

The policies available through the Mexico experts at West Coast Insurance, all are US Style Policy Structure. Meaning, it is very similar to a US homeowner’s policy in terms of how it reads and covers your home in Mexico. Some of the highlights include easy understanding deductibles, replacement cost and broad open peril coverage for your home and personal belongings. Also, hard to find coverage like earthquake, wind, flood, & hurricane options.

Always Here to Help YOU!


THE BAJA GOOD LIFE CLUB is a discount club dedicated to enhancing the lives of Expats residents of Baja California through tours, discounts, insuranceWe are working provide you with better service and have now added LIVE CHAT / MESSAGING to all the BGLC websites; look to the bottom right corner. You are able to CHAT LIVE or leave a message and we will return your message within 1 business day. We continue to provide Baja information from history to fun facts all about Baja!

The Baja Good Life Club is forever finding you Baja discounts, helping to keep you covered with Mexican insurance, sponsor fun Baja give-a-ways throughout the year at parties and charity events in Rosarito Beach, San Felipe, throughout Baja.

Mexico Protects Beaches For Public Use



CancĂșn has the first; more to follow in other beach destinations. While all Mexican beaches are public most beachfront-built infrastructure caters to paying customers. But federal tourism authorities intend to turn the tables by creating public beach parks to further enhance the enjoyment of residents and visitors.

The first such facility opened to the public in December in CancĂșn, Quintana Roo. Since then, the 15.5-million-peso (US $750,000) Maya Langosta Public Park and its 135-meter-long beach extending over 7,000 square meters has received on average 2,000 visitors a week.